Animal lovers furious over judge’s decision

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Guam Animals In Need reported that two dogs were killed with a hammer in Yigo.

Animal lovers are furious over Superior Court Judge Michael Bordallo’s dismissal of the case against Gerald Wayne Cruz II, the man accused of shooting dogs in Yigo.

This is the second time that a case against Cruz was dismissed. According to PNC files, judge Bordallo dismissed the first indictment against Cruz, ruling that the indictment failed to allege that Cruz had cruelly killed the animals.

Guam Animals In Need, in its social media page, expressed shock over the decision.

“Charges were again dropped against an admitted pet killer. Our legal team is reviewing the order, and we’ll put out a full statement next week,” GAIN stated.

Earlier, GAIN board president Cyrus Luhr says GAIN pleaded with the Office of the Attorney General to continue to pursue charges against Cruz.

“I think we were all disappointed and dismayed by the developments in the case. The community really wants to see animal welfare be a priority especially when it comes to enforcement and so to see that happen was very frustrating. That’s why we called upon the attorney general to continue to pursue the case,” Luhr said.

With the second dismissal of the case GAIN is calling for an organized mobilization and lobbying effort, asking its constituents to call media, senators and the governor to demand passage of the Protecting Animal Welfare and Safety (PAWS) Act.

The PAWS Act, introduced by Sen. Sabina Perez, improves three key areas of Guam’s animal cruelty laws. First, it clarifies Guam’s existing standards for animal cruelty and includes a new distinction between animal abuse and animal neglect to more easily allow for citations of the latter.

Second, the PAWS Act adds new pre-conviction processes, which include procedures for properly seizing abused animals and ensuring for their care.

And third, it establishes post-conviction processes, which include provisions for community service, education, registration for felony convictions, and court-ordered mental health care and treatment.

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