Army Corps of Engineers all set to provide additional power generation for GMH

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William Kando, Guam Memorial Hospital''s Associate Administrator of Operations, says the need for the added infrastructure was borne out of the recent surge in COVID-hospitalizations.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is supporting temporary electrical capacity upgrades at the island’s COVID-designated facility.

William Kando, Guam Memorial Hospital”s Associate Administrator of Operations, says the need for the added infrastructure was borne out of the recent surge in COVID-hospitalizations.

He says hospitalized patients are overflowing into areas where the electric capacity is simply not there to support heavy medical equipment and negative pressure machines.

The team is bringing in a 100-kilowatt generator as the power supply to support the upgrades and the intermediate design was just submitted Friday.

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“They’ll quickly turn that, once they take our feedback, turn it into a final design. They’re trying to start work as early as this Monday coming up. And once they start, they’re looking at a 30-calendar day construction from start to finish. It’s going to be a very quick project for them because it’s considered a temporary upgrade,” Kando said.

He added: “So when they fix this system within the next 30 days, our job is to…we want to put that emergency generator, that 110K generator, out of business so that we can then move towards a more permanent solution so we can still have this capability beyond that 30 days going forward…because who knows how many COVID waves we’re going to have. We just don’t know.”

Kando says the generator is the most temporary part of the project, as no hospital is meant to run on generator power as their primary source

FEMA is paying for the entire project, which also involves NavFac and a local company called Hansel and Phelps.

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