VIDEO: Dire Predictions About Sequestration Fail to Materialize

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Washington D.C. – Sequestration is apparently not the ‘budget eating’ monster many in Washington initially feared it would be.

According to a report this week in the Washington Post Monday, the worst fears about the impact of Sequestration have proved wrong. 

READ the report in the Washington Post HERE

HEAR Matt Kaye’s report HERE>>>7-3 noscareinsequester.mp3

The Post report refers to the Obama Administration’s “specific…and alarming” predictions like one-hour waits at airport security, prison guards furloughed for 12-days, FBI agents furloughed up to 14 days,  the military health program unable to pay the bills for service members,  low-income women and children, denied federal food aid. But none of those things happened.

Of 48 dire sequestration predictions the Post looked at, just 11 came true. Among them, the Pentagon said sequestration would reduce training for the Army, flying time for the Air Force and ship deployments for the Navy. All three happened.

And sequestration has prompted furloughs on Guam, where some 2-thousand DoD civilians are facing 11 unpaid vacation days through the end of the fiscal year on September 30th.

Guam Governor Eddie Calvo spoke about the impact last February during a visit to Washington.
 
February 2013 -Governor Calvo: “When I talk about transportation, when I say cutbacks in that area, and FAA and TSA, that means a stemming of the flow of monies coming in, as a result of the tourism services industry.  The other piston to our engine is Defense Department and military outlays for Guam and military investment.”

But even the number of originally planned military furlough days was reduced,  and Congress averted air traffic controller delays by substituting unused airport improvement money.

U.S. Park police were supposed to have 12 furlough days, they’re now faced with only three.  The Park Service found savings in its budget.

Customs and Border protection agents avoided furloughs when DHS shifted funds around. And  the Justice Department cut more than $300-million in “expired balances.”

The U.S. Geological Survey cut conference expenses.

The White House claims it didn’t exaggerate. They believed sequestration would be bad.  They just got unexpected help from Congress.

But Congresswoman Madeleine Bordallo lamented the lack of a permanent ‘fix’ in the FY ’14 Defense budget before the House last month.
 
June 2013 -Bordallo: “I hope that this Congress undertakes serious efforts to finally fix sequestration, with a comprehensive solution.  We can avoid this problem.”
 
But come October and the new fiscal year, the White House expects a $109-billion dollar cut, with fewer ways to soften the blow.  The White House is pressing Congress to replace the sequester.

Only trouble is, Republicans say, “the sky didn’t fall this time.”  As a result, the Administration will have a hard time putting the “scare back into the sequester” next time.

sequester ‘scare’ gone?   pnc news mdk   7-03-13

 

s.l. sequestration is not the ‘budget eating’ monster president obama and his administration made it out to be, according to a report this week in the washington post.  pnc washington corr. matt kaye reports—

 

m.k. the post says the administration issued “specific…and alarming” predictions–one-hour waits at airport security…prison guards furloughed for 12-days…fbi agents, up to 14…the military health program, unable to pay its bills for service members…low-income women and children, denied federal food aid…

            but none of those happened.

            of 48 dire sequestration predictions the post looked at, just 11 came true.

            pentagon officials predicted reduced training for the army, flying time for the air force…ship deployments for the navy.

            they did all three.

            and furloughs will be felt on guam, where some 2-thousand dod civilians will start taking 11 unpaid days next week.

            departmentwide, 650-thousand civilians are affected…

            governor eddie calvo, interviewed here last february–

 

            322 calvo   “when i talk about transportation, when i say cutbacks in that area, and faa and tsa, that means a stemming of the flow of monies coming in, as a result of the tourism services industry.  the other piston to our engine is defense department and military outlays for guam…and military investment.”  :16

 

            but even military furlough days were reduced…and congress averted air traffic controller delays by substituting unused airport imiprovement money.

            us park police were supposed to have 12 furlough days—they took three.  the park service found savings in its budget.

            customs and border protection agents avoided furloughs when dhs shifted funds around…the justice department cut more than 300-million in “expired balances.”

            the u-s geological survey cut conference expenses.

           

            the white house claims it didn’t exaggerate—they believed sequestration would be bad.  they just got unexpected help from congress.

            but congresswoman madeleine bordallo lamented the lack of a pemanent ‘fix’ in the fy ’14 defense budget before the house last month–

 

            000 bordallo   “i hope that this congress undertakes serious efforts to finally fix sequestration, with a comprehensive solution.  we can avoid this problem.”  :10

 

            but come october and the new fiscal year, the white house expects a 109-billion dollar cut—with fewer ways to soften the blow.  the white house is pressing congress to replace the sequester.

            only trouble is, republicans say, ‘the sky didn’t fall this time’…the administration will have a hard time putting the ‘scare back into the sequester’ next time.

 

o.c. on capitol hill, matt kaye for pnc news