VIDEO: CNMI Report – Beached Whale at Micro Beach Put Down; 2nd in as Many Days

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Saipan – The CNMI Division of Fish and Wildlife [DFW] euthanized a young whale that beached itself on the shore of Micro Beach in Garapan Tuesday morning.

DFW called in private veterinarian Dr. Ed Tudor to put the the 13 1/2-foot, 600-650-lb. whale to sleep.

The Saipan Tribune reports that the decision to end the whale’s life was made because DFW determined that the marine mammal was not going to get any better.

[Photo courtesy Saipan Tribune: Clarissa V. David]

It was then towed to Smiling Cove Marina where the dead whale was put on a trailer and brought to a holding facility where DFW said it will be kept cold and probably frozen.

DFW said two or three members of the Marine Mammal Stranding Network from Hawaii are expected to arrive today to do a necropsy—an autopsy performed on an animal.

It is the second day in a row that a beached whale has been found. On Monday, a dead whale was found on the back reef outside  the Oleai Beach Bar & Grill. DFW does not think the 2 incidents are related.



Beached whale at Micro Beach put down

A young whale found beached on the shore of Micro Beach in Garapan was put down at past 3pm yesterday, a few hours after being found.

Fisheries biologist Mike Tenorio of the Division of Fish and Wildlife said the decision to euthanize the whale, which measured approximately 13 1/2 feet long and weighed about 600 to 650 lbs, was based on the progression of the whale since 8am yesterday when they received a call about the stranded marine mammal.

Tenorio said they were in communication with their federal counterparts in Hawaii to discuss what needed to be done with the whale.

Based on their monitoring, Tenorio said it appeared that the whale was not going to get any better.

DFW called in private veterinarian Dr. Ed Tudor, who said in an interview that he administered “a lot” of solution in order to put the whale to sleep.

Tenorio said two or three members of the Marine Mammal Stranding Network from Hawaii are expected to arrive today to do a necropsy-an autopsy performed on an animal.