Vice Speaker Seeks Ban on Sale of Synthetic Chemicals Used as Illicit Drug Substitute

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Guam -Vice Speaker B.J. Cruz has introduced a bill that would prohibit the sale of synthetic chemical products which can be used as a substitute for the illegal drugs of cocaine or ecstasy.

These synthetic products are sometimes marketed as “bath salts”  or “plant food.”

If enacted, Bill No. 78-3 1 (COR) would prohibit the sale of products that contains the synthetic stimulants MDPV, or  3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone, and methylmethcathinone (mephedrone).

Read Bill 78

In a release, Vice Speaker Cruz says the aim of Bill 78 is to protect Guam’s youth and stem the use of synthetic drugs.

Cruz says that these chemicals are neither controlled by the Drug Enforcement Administration nor approved for human consumption by the Food and Drug Administration.

The release goes onto to state that the chemicals:

“are often sold under various street names like Ivory Wave and Vanilla Sky then snorted, eaten, or smoked as a substitute for cocaine or ecstasy. These synthetic drugs are known to cause increased blood pressure and heart rate, panic attacks, agitation, hallucinations, extreme paranoia and delusion, depression, kidney pain, and bloodshot eyes.

Throughout the nation, Poison Control Centers have received numerous calls related to “bath salts.” One poison control director called “bath salts” a
combination of “The worst characteristics of LSD, PCP, Ecstasy, cocaine and methamphetamine.”

A growing number of states, including North Dakota, Mississippi, Florida, Hawaii, and Kentucky, are moving to ban “bath salts.” White House drug czar Gil Kerlikowske said in a statement, “They pose a serious threat to the health and well-being of young people and anyone who uses them.” With
the introduction of Bill No. 78-3 1 (COR), Vice Speaker Cruz hopes to help limit accessibility to these dangerous synthetic drugs and the violent nature of their side effects.

 

 MINA

TRENTA I UNO NA LZHESLATURAN

GUAHAN

–.I

3

201

1 (First) Regular Session

I
‘-I
-3

Bill No.

78-5\

Introduced by:
B.J.F. Cruz

%

AN
ACT
TO
PROHIBIT
THE
CATHINONE
DERIVATIVES
METHYENEDIOXYPYROVALERONE
AND METHYLMETHCATHINONE BY AMENDING
APPENDIX A (E) (4) OF CHAPTER 67 OF TITLE 9 OF
THE GUAM CODE ANNOTATED
BE IT ENACTED BY THE PEOPLE OF GUAM:
Section

1.

Legislative Findings and Intent. I Liheslaturan Guhhan finds that

methyenedioxypyrovalerone

(MDPV) and methylmethcathinone (mephedrone) are
often marketed as “bath salts” with names like Ivory Wave and Vanilla Sky. These
products, when snorted, eaten or smoked, and are used as a legal substitute for
cocaine or ecstasy. MDVP is a psychoactive drug with stimulant properties. It is
reported that it has four times the potency of Ritalin. It is not FDA approved and is
only a controlled, scheduled drug in some states. It is also known as MDPK,
Magic, Super Coke and PV. In 201 0, it was sold as a legal drug alternative and
marketed in the United States as “bath salts” in gas stations and convenience stores,
similar to the marketing for Spice and K2 as incense. MDPV was then going
under the street names of Cloud

9,

Ivory Wave, Ocean, Charge Plus, White
Lightning, Scarface, Hurricane Charlie, Red Dove and White Dove. The effects

can last for six to eight hours. High doses have been observed to cause intense,
prolonged panic attacks in stimulant-intolerant users with reports of psychosis
from sleep withdrawal and dependence at higher doses. Extended binges have
caused significant withdrawal symptoms such as depression, lethargy, headache,
anxiety, lightheadedness, weakness, bruxism (teeth grinding, jaw clenching),
kidney pain, abdominal pain and bloodshot eyes. Mephedrone is the common
name for 4-methylmethcathinone. Mephedrone is a psychoactive substance which
is a cathinone derivative. Cathinone is a monoamine alkaloid found in the shrub
Catha edulis(khat) and is chemically similar to ephedrine and some amphetamines.
Cathinone derivatives are closely related to the phenethylamine family of
psychostimulants. Cathinone and its analogs are considered illegal drugs in the
United States. Mephedrone has been identified in ‘ecstasyt-like tablets, but it is
also sold as a “legal high”

a legal alternative to amphetamine and cocaine.
Mephedrone is advertised as a research chemical, bath salts, for botanical research,
plant food, and plant feeder. Producers of these psychoactive substances

many
of them based overseas

package them with the label “not for human
consumption,” to escape FDA regulations. Therefore, I Liheslaturan Guhhan finds
that in order to protect Guam’s youth and its residents, it is necessary to prohibit
mephedrone and MDPV.
Section 2. Item

(E)

(4) of Appendix A of Chapter 67 of Title

9

of the Guam
Code Annotated is hereby

amended

to read as follows:
“(E) Material, compound, mixture or preparation containing any quantity of
the following substances having a stimulant effect on the central nervous system,
including their salts, isomers and salts of isomers:
(I) Arninorex (other names: aminoxaphen; 2-amino-5-phenyl-2-
oxazoline; or 4,5-dihydro-5-phenly-2-oxazolamine);
(2) Cathinone (other names: 2-amino-

1

-phenyl- 1 -propanone,

alpha-aminopropiophenone, 2-aminopropiophenone, and norephedrone);
(3) Fenethylline;
(4) Methcathinone (other names: 2-(methylamino)- propiophenone:

alpha-(methy1amino)propiophenone; 2-(methylamino)- 1 -phenylpropan-1-

one; alpha-N-methylaminopropiophenone; monomethylpropion; ephedrone;
N-methylcathinone; methylcathinone; AL-464; AL-422; AL-463 and
UR1432), its salts, optical isomers and salts of optical isomers);
methyenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone), and,
unless listed in another schedule, any compound other than bupropion that is
structurally derived from 2-Amino- 1 -phenyl 1

1 -propanone by modification in any
of the following ways:
(i) By substitution in the phenyl ring to any extent with alkyl,
alkoxy, alkylenedioxy, haloalkyl or halide substituents, whether or not hrther
substituted in the phenyl ring by one or more other univalent substituents;
(ii) By substitution at the 3-position with an alkyl substituent;
(iii) By substitution at the nitrogen atom with alkyl or dialkyl
groups, or by inclusion of the nitrogen atom in a cyclic structure.
(5) (+I-)cis-4-methylaminorex (other name: (+I-)cis-4,5- dihydro-4-

methyl-5-phenyl-2-oxazolamine);

(6)

N-ethylamphetamine; and

(7)

N,N-dimethylamphetamine (other name: N,N-

alphatrimethylphenethylamine).”

NEWS RELEASE

Wednesday, February 16,20 1 1

Vice Speaker Cruz introduces Bill No.

78-31

(COR) to prohibit synthetic
drugs marketed as “bath salts” or labeled as plant food
As

part of his ongoing effort to protect Guam’s youth and stem the use of synthetic
drugs, Vice Speaker Cruz introduced Bill No. 78-3 1 (COR). If enacted, Bill No.
78-3 1 (COR) would prohibit “bath salts” drugs, also sometimes labeled as plant
food that contains the synthetic stimulants MDPV, or 3,4-
methylenedioxypyrovalerone, and methylmethcathinone (mephedrone). These
chemicals are neither controlled by the Drug Enforcement Administration nor
approved for human consumption by the Food and Drug Administration. Yet, they
are often sold under various street names like Ivory Wave and Vanilla Sky then
snorted, eaten, or smoked as a substitute for cocaine or ecstasy. These synthetic
drugs are known to cause increased blood pressure and heart rate, panic attacks,
agitation, hallucinations, extreme paranoia and delusion, depression, kidney pain,
and bloodshot eyes.
Throughout the nation, Poison Control Centers have received numerous calls
related to “bath salts.” One poison control director called “bath salts” a
combination of “The worst characteristics of LSD, PCP, Ecstasy, cocaine and
methamphetamine.”

A

growing number of states, including North Dakota,
Mississippi, Florida, Hawaii, and Kentucky, are moving to ban “bath salts.” White
House drug czar Gil Kerlikowske said in a statement, “They pose a serious threat
to the health and well-being of young people and anyone who uses them.” With
the introduction of Bill No. 78-3 1 (COR), Vice Speaker Cruz hopes to help limit
accessibility to these dangerous synthetic drugs and the violent nature of their side
effects.
Senator Cruz remains committed to the preservation

of

the health and wellness of
Guam’s youth and residents