Bordallo: Excluding Compensation for Descendants of Those Injured During Occupation Is Nothing New

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Guam – Congresswoman Madelenine Bordallo’s Spokeswoman Kelly Toves says the provision excluding compensation for those injured during the occupation, “is not new.”

During her Thursday testimony on the Omnibus Act which includes H.R. 44, the Congresswoman said:

BORDALLO: “The text reflects a compromise that was reached with the Senate, when they considered the legislation, as a provision of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011. That compromise removes one claims category, but protects the claims of living survivors, and we went along with this.”

In an email response to PNC News about that comment, Toves said H.R. 44, the Guam World War II Loyalty Recognition Act, was introduced in both the 112th and 113th Congresses “without this claimant category.” She explained that this one claimant category “was eliminated after a full year of discussion and debate on Guam. “

Local leaders, and the community, were notified and the removal of this category was discussed with them, said Toves. “Ms. Bordallo has even discussed this in her annual Congressional Address speeches,”  she said.

Her written testimony submitted to the Senate Committee Bordallo said:

READ the full text of her testimony to the Committee HERE [go to page 3]

BORDALLO: “… this section addresses concerns that have been raised about this legislation in the past. First, the text reflects a compromise that was reached with the Senate when they considered the legislation as a provision of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011. That compromise removes payment of claims to heirs of survivors who suffered personal injury during the enemy occupation. The provision continues to provide payment of claims to survivors of the occupation as well as to heirs of citizens of Guam who died during the occupation. The compromise continues to uphold the intent of recognizing the people of Guam for their loyalty to the United States during World War II.”

Toves explained these remarks by saying the “Congresswoman highlighted this compromise in her testimony to give an overview of the many hurdles the bill has had to overcome and to demonstrate the steps she has taken to address cost concerns.”

The compromise should reduce the overall cost of Guam War Claims from an estimated $100-million dollars down to some $80-million.