Bordallo: Not Clear Yet How Senate NDAA Provisions Will Effect Guam Buildup

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Guam – Guam Congresswoman Madeleine Bordallo says it is not clear how the Senate’s version of the National Defense Authorization Act [NDAA] will effect the Guam Buildup.

Bordallo is reacting to Senator Claire McCaskill’s announcement that her Armed Services Subcommittee would freeze any further spending on the buildup until DoD presents a Master Plan and provides details of the total cost.

A final decision on buildup funding is still some way off. “The Senate provisions,” says Bordallo, “will ultimately be reconciled with the House bill during conference committee later this year.”

But she warns that “The Senate’s actions may also have unintended consequences for the bilateral relationship  between the United States and Japan.”  And she points out that the House remains supportive of the buildup by voting last month to fully fund  “military construction associated with the realignment of Marines.”

Bordallo also points out that the Obama Administration and DoD have yet to weigh in on the issue, and their positions are likely to be more supportive of moving forward with full funding for the buildup.

READ Bordallo’s statement in FULL below:

Congresswoman Bordallo Reacts to Statements by Senator Claire McCaskill
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – June 15, 2011 – Washington, D.C. –

Congresswoman Madeleine Z. Bordallo today issued the following statement regarding remarks made by U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill during a Senate Armed Services Subcommittee mark-up of Senate version of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012.  Senator McCaskill is the Chairwoman of the Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Readiness and Management Support.

“The details of the Senate’s version of the NDAA have not been publicly released, and it is not exactly clear how Senate provisions will affect Guam and the military build-up,” said Congresswoman Bordallo. “I have stressed on numerous occasions that the Department of Defense needs to be more transparent and better communicate its needs and requirements to the Senate, as they have done to the House.  Last month, the House remained supportive of the military build-up and fully funded military construction associated with the realignment of Marines.  We are mindful of the cost increases but recognize that the military build-up is an investment in the future security of our nation and important to the future economy of our island.  The Senate’s actions may also have unintended consequences for the bilateral relationship between the United States and Japan at this critical juncture prior to the US-Japan Security Consultative Committee meeting next week.  I expect the Obama Administration and DoD to weigh-in on the Senate provisions and to comment on their feasibility and potential impacts with alliance partners.  We live in a dangerous part of the world, and the freedom of movement for our forces is critical and can be best achieved on Guam.  The Senate provisions will ultimately be reconciled with the House bill during conference committee later this year.”