CNMI: Relatives of U.S. Citizens Eligible For Parole Extension; Congressman Sablan Thanks DHS & INS

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Saipan – CNMI Congressman Gregorio “Kilili” Sablan has announced that the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Immigration have agreed to grant a parole extension of up to 2-years for the foreign relatives of U.S. citizens in the CNMI.

The extension applies mostly to the alien workers living in the CNMI whose children are U.S. Citizens by virtue of being born there.

The parole extenison will be granted on a case by case basis. A release from Congressman Sablan thanks USCIS Director Mayorkas, Secretary Napolitano, and President Obama “for their continuing support of these families. They have given them another Thanksgiving to remember,” says Sablan.      

READ the release from Congressman Sablan below:

Congressman Gregorio Kilili Camacho Sablan said today that the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) may grant two-year extensions, on a case-by-case basis, to eligible individuals granted parole under the “immediate relative” policy as of November 5.

Individuals paroled under the current policy and granted permission to work in the Northern Marianas must also apply for an extension of work authorization after the parole request is approved. USCIS has indicated it will monitor processing times for employment authorizations to ensure timeliness.  Additional information and instructions for submitting a request for extension of parole can be found here.

“I am very thankful to USCIS Director Mayorkas, Secretary Napolitano, and President Obama for their continuing support of these families. They have given them another Thanksgiving to remember.”       

The USCIS decision covers the immediate relatives of U.S. citizens – one of the four groups defined in Congressman Sablan’s bill, H.R. 1466. Parole policies covering the other three groups – persons born in the Northern Marianas between 1974 and 1978, CNMI Permanent Residents, the immediate relatives of these two groups remain in effect.  USCIS will extend humanitarian parole to persons in these groups provided they submit a request with required documentation and meet the eligibility requirements.

H.R. 1466 would allow these four groups, who were left out of U.S. Public Law 110-229, to lawfully remain in the Northern Marianas. That law was principally focused on the status of foreign workers and investors. Sablan stated shortly after his winning his reelection that he intends to introduce a broader version of H.R. 1466 in the 113th Congress.

“I am encouraged by President Obama’s announcement that immigration will be at the top of his agenda in his second term. I am looking forward to getting back to work on fixing the problems created by P.L. 110-229.”