Former owners of Guam Medical Transport plead guilty to Medicare fraud

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$10 million in fraudulent claims for ambulance services with Guam Medical Transport were not medically necessary.

The former owners of Guam Medical Transport have signed plea agreements admitting to participating in a conspiracy to commit health care fraud.

Clifford Shoemake, the CEO of the company, signed his plea agreement Tuesday morning. His son Nicholas Shoemake and Kimberly Conner signed plea agreements Monday.

All three entered their guilty pleas in District Court Tuesday morning.

They were indicted in January 2016 on allegations that they conspired to defraud Medicare and TriCare by submitting more than $10 million in fraudulent claims for ambulance services with Guam Medical Transport that were not medically necessary.

According to the terms of their plea agreements, the three admitted that between March 2010 and March 2014 they executed a scheme to defraud Medicare and Tricare “by submitting claims for providing medically unnecessary ambulance transportation services for beneficiaries who did not qualify for those services.”

They are now facing a maximum penalty of not more than 10 years in jail, 3 years of supervised release and a fine of up to $250,000.

Nicholas Shoemake
Kimberly Conner
Clifford Shoemake