GreenPeace “Demands” WCFPC Conference on Guam Work on Sustainable Tuna Fishing Practices

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Guam – The conservation group GreenPeace has issued a demand to the WCFPC leaders gathered on Guam this week for a more sustainable tuna fishing practices in the Pacific.

 

Fishing industry leaders from 25 Pacific nations are gathered at the Hyatt in Tumon this week for the 8th regular meeting of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission.

The fiswhnewseu.com website reports that GreenPeace is demanding that:

* WCPFC listen to consumer and industry demands for sustainable tuna

*  end all fishing in the Pacific Commons

* ban wasteful Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) in purse seine fisheries

*  cut the bigeye tuna catch in half.

The website reports that GreenPeace this week released its ranking of Canadian canned tuna companies’ “sustainability achievements”, which GreenPeace says shows an “increasing consumer demand for responsibly-sourced tuna.”

The story quotes  GreenPeace International Oceans campaigner Sari Tolvanen as saying: “If we want ample fish and fishing industries for the future, we need drastic change today. This Canadian ranking shows that change is taking place across the global tuna marketplace, thanks to consumers and visionary business leaders.”

READ the article on fishnewseu.con HERE

Tolvanen is also quoted as saying that the WCPFC members meeting here on Guam “must strengthen its existing conservation measures and manage Pacific tuna populations for the benefit of everyone, not just the industrial fishing industry lobbyists.”

 

Greenpeace targets Guam Print E-mail
Monday, 26 March 2012 11:50

AS politicians gather in Guam for the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCFPC), Greenpeace released its ranking of Canadian canned tuna companies’ sustainability achievements, showing increasing consumer demand for responsibly-sourced tuna.

 

The conservation NGO is demanding that the WCPFC listen to consumer and industry demand for sustainable tuna and end all fishing in the Pacific Commons, ban wasteful Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) in purse seine fisheries and cut the bigeye tuna catch in half.

“If we want ample fish and fishing industries for the future, we need drastic change today,” said Sari Tolvanen, Greenpeace International oceans campaigner. “This Canadian ranking shows that change is taking place across the global tuna marketplace, thanks to consumers and visionary business leaders. It is clearer than ever that the WCPFC must strengthen its existing conservation        measures and manage Pacific tuna populations for the benefit of everyone, not just the industrial fishing industry lobbyists.”

The Western and Central Pacific Ocean is the world’s largest tuna fishery, where roughly 60% of the world’s tuna supplies come from. According to the conservation organisation, bigeye tuna is now overfished and yellowfin skipjack and albacore tunas are all in decline. Destructive fishing methods, such as purse seine fishing on FADs, are largely to blame, along with the WCPFC’s failure to follow its own scientists’ advice in reducing tuna catches.

“We know that illegal fishing is rampant in the Pacific, causing island communities to lose food and jobs to foreign fishing powers, the same ones who are trying to unravel conservation measures here in Guam. This can and must be the year when this Commission puts the ability of the world to        eat and fish tuna for generations to come ahead of corporate profits,” added Tolvanen.

Greenpeace has also just released two Pacific tuna reports: one outlining progress taken by tuna companies to save Pacific tuna in recent years and another detailing illegal fishing activities, documented by Greenpeace during its 2011 “Defending our Pacific” ship tour.

Greenpeace is campaigning for a global network of marine reserves covering 40% of the world’s oceans and for a more sustainable fishing industry, both necessary steps to restoring our oceans to health. Around the world, Greenpeace is working with retailers and tuna brands across Europe,        Australia and the Americas to increase the market share of sustainably-sourced tuna.