Group challenges cannabis board fact sheet

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Andrea Pellacani, who is a managing partner of Grassroots Guam as well as a Newstalk K57 radio host, raised some concerns to CCB Chairwoman Vanessa Williams about the wording provided in the fact sheet, which seemed to imply that cannabis products other than dried flowers would be illegal to possess.

Four months after the legalization of adult-use cannabis, the Cannabis Control Board is still working to provide clear regulations to the public regarding the possession of such products. 

Grassroots Guam, a local cannabis advocacy group, has challenged verbiage provided by the Cannabis Control Board in a fact sheet the board recently released. 

Andrea Pellacani, who is a managing partner of Grassroots Guam as well as a Newstalk K57 radio host, raised some concerns to CCB Chairwoman Vanessa Williams about the wording provided in the fact sheet, which seemed to imply that cannabis products other than dried flowers would be illegal to possess. 

“Our concern was that the question they were responding to was, “How much cannabis can I have on me or in my vehicle?” which is a possession limit. We thought it was best to go with what was stated in the law, rather to interpret that it’s not for sale and promulgate rules or anything like that,” Pellacani said.

According to Public Law 35-5, adults 21 years and older are able to possess one ounce or less of cannabis, 8 grams or less of cannabis concentrate, or any cannabis-infused products containing 800 milligrams or less of tetrahydrocannabinol. 

In response, Williams clarified that what the board meant to say was that cannabis concentrate or cannabis-infused products will not be available for consumption until a licensed retailer is established on island, in accordance with public law. 

In addition, Williams says that the CCB will postpone the official release of the fact sheets so that the board may review Pellacani’s concerns at their next meeting. 

Pellacani says that she is optimistic that the board will work to distribute clear and accurate information to the public regarding cannabis regulations as it would affect how the legal system processes incidents regarding possession. One of the concerns she highlighted included a possession limit for people who harvest cannabis. 

“This has been addressed in the FAQs. It’s sort of…I think we should consider getting the AG to weigh in on how it should be worded because while the possession limits for flowers, infused products, and concentrates are explicit in the law, what’s not explicit and subject to interpretation is when you harvest your plants,” Pellacani said.

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