Guam Beekeepers Association celebrates World Bee Day

209
The Guam Beekeepers Association was accompanied by several other small and locally owned businesses to educate Guam's community about pollinators and sell their honey products. (PNC photo)

The Guam Beekeepers Association celebrated World Bee Day recently by educating Guam’s community about the importance of our pollinators.

PNC joined the Guam Beekeepers Association for World Bee Day at Skinners Plaza.

World Bee Day is celebrated around the globe on May 20th. The designated day recognizes the importance of pollinators and their contributions to agriculture and commemorates the birthday of Anton Jansa, a pioneer of modern beekeeping.

The Guam Beekeepers Association was accompanied by several other small and locally owned businesses to educate Guam’s community about pollinators and sell their honey products.

Among the association’s educational demonstrations were the exhibition of beehives, bee dances, and additional beekeeping information.

When asked about the importance of raising awareness of bees and the role they play in Guam’s small businesses, the president of the Guam Beekeepers Association, Christopher Rosario, stated:

“Again, bees very versatile pollinators. They are not only important for our ecosystem, they are also important to our health. A lot of beekeepers, small business owners, are retired. But a lot of them have seen the importance of it, even for their own healthy lifestyle.”

According to Rosario, educating Guam’s community about the threats that pollinators face is essential for preserving our bees impacting our ecosystem. Rosario stated that one of the biggest threats to pollinators on Guam is an invasive species known as the greater banded hornet.

Dennis Larsen, the media director of the Guam Beekeepers Association and the founder of Raw 671 Honey, echoed Rosario’s statement saying:

“The biggest threat that we have now on Guam is the greater banded hornet — or people refer to it as the murder hornet. Those hornets now can decimate an entire honeybee colony in one day. So, we’ve had to adapt with guards and different things over the entrances of our hives so that the hornets can’t actually get in there and do it.”

Both Rosario and Larsen stated that another threat to Guam’s bees is people’s instinct to destroy beehives out of fear. However, the Guam Beekeepers Association says that the best way to combat this threat is by contacting the association to rescue the wild beehives.

Along with contacting the Guam Beekeepers Association to rescue wild beehives or swarms, people can help preserve Guam’s local pollinators by supporting the beekeepers and farmers who protect the bees through their small businesses.

For more information and to get involved, visit Guam Beekeepers Association on Facebook.

##