Guam Guard undertakes radiation training

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From catastrophic nuclear events to radiological accidents, our first responders have to be prepared for anything and everything.

As part of an effort to remain prepared in the event of a disaster, the Guam National Guard hosted a set of trainings this week about the consequences and treatment of radiation exposure.

From catastrophic nuclear events to radiological accidents, our first responders have to be prepared for anything and everything. In order to remain vigilant in the face of potential threats, the Guam National Guard’s 94th Civil Support Team hosted the MEIR course, a three-day training pertaining to the Medical Effects of Ionizing Radiation that is held throughout the year at various major U.S military bases around the world.

Participants — which not only included guardsmen, but physicians, nuclear specialists, and first responders — learned about the biological effects of radiation exposure as well as how to diagnose and treat radiation syndrome through tabletop exercises as well as various presentations conducted by subject matter experts.

According to Ray Toves, the director of the civil support training and readiness division of the U.S. Army Pacific, the course is a testament to the island’s responsiveness to potential emergencies.

“It’s just one of the many efforts that the island has taken to be prepared for almost anything — be it natural or man-made disasters. It’s just a way of us preparing the island for almost anything,” Toves said.

He added that he is appreciative of the attentiveness that the people of the island have given in regards to the course.

“I think it’s a great course and I’m happy that the community is actually present for the training,” Toves said.

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