Guam has ordered 3,800 of other COVID-vaccine, Moderna; currently awaiting Emergency Use Authorization 

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Guam Public Health has placed an order for the second COVID-vaccine widely spoken of, the Moderna product.

Janela Carrera, the spokesperson for DPHSS, confirmed to PNC News that they placed the order last Saturday, to the tune of 3,800 doses.

The 3,800 injections will fully inoculate 1,900 people on Island, since it, too, is a 2-dose vaccine, spaced 28-days apart; the Pfizer product is only spaced 21-days apart.

Carrera says they placed the order on Saturday, just shortly after the U.S. government announced it’s purchasing another 100 million doses of the product.

Federally, that now brings the total ordered of that specific vaccine to 200 million doses, enough to cover 100 million people.

Like the Pfizer product, Moderna is going through the infrastructure to receive Emergency Use Authorization. The FDA advisory panel is expected to meet on Thursday (Friday Guam time) to discuss the merits of the vaccine. If it receives an EUA, first doses will roll out this month, similar to the Pfizer product.

Guam Public Health had previously said that the Island would be getting 50,000 doses of the Moderna vaccine, but Carrera said that things change constantly in these conversations and thus far, 3,800 doses have been approved and ordered.

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Mai Habib
Mai Habib is a radio and television broadcaster and journalist originally from Toronto, Canada. She worked at CTV News and CFRA in Canada for over 5-years, where she was a reporter, anchor and show host. After a brief stop in Canadian politics and the non-profit world, she's happy to be back at the news desk on Guam. Mai is a graduate of Ryerson University's journalism program and completed her Master's in International Affairs and Public Policy at Carleton University. She is excited to be reporting on Guam's current affairs, legislature and other topical issues.