Historical documents turned over to UOG; cultural, academic exchanges with Spain started

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At a ceremony Tuesday afternoon at UOG, a Spanish delegation comprised of officials from the Spanish Navy and San Pablo University turned over one of two known remaining manuscript copies of "Memoria de las Islas Marianas" for permanent deposit at UOG's Richard Flores Taitano Micronesian Area Research Center. (PNC photo)

A ceremonial handover of historical documents happened Tuesday afternoon at the University of Guam which also started a tie-up between the university and Spain for cultural and academic exchanges.

At a ceremony Tuesday afternoon at UOG, a Spanish delegation comprising of officials from the Spanish Navy and San Pablo University turned over one of two known remaining manuscript copies of “Memoria de las Islas Marianas” for permanent deposit at UOG’s Richard Flores Taitano Micronesian Area Research Center.

The document was handwritten by Father José Palomo in 1896, copied from the original, which was written in the late 1850s by former Spanish governor of the Mariana Islands Felipe de la Corte y Ruano-Calderón and published in 1876. It comes to the university from the family of the last Spanish governor of the Mariana Islands, Don Juan Marina.

Dr. Thomas W. Krise, UOG President, described the significance of the turnover and said the next step would be to translate and digitize the documents.

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“That document will be now at our possession at MARC at the Micronesian Area Resource Center. We will now work to transcribe and translate it and digitize it…to make it more useful and valuable to researchers and the public,” Krise said.

UOG also signed a Memorandum of Understanding to encourage faculty and student exchanges between the University of Guam and universities in Spain, particularly the University of San Pablo.

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“We are looking forward to being able to get students …go back and forth…we think that there might be a good opportunity as we develop the Guam cultural repository that’s being built here on campus,” Krise said.

He added that with the partnership, they expect more instruction in archaeology, museum studies, and history.

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