Marine Corps officials say base and firing range good for cultural & historical preservation

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“If you want to protect cultural resources one of the best ways to do that is to put a range down on it.” – Major Tim Patrick

Guam – DOD officials say that the planned marine base on Guam and the live fire training range at the Northwest Field overlooking the Ritidian Wildlife Refuge will be good for cultural and historical conservation efforts.

Marine Corps Activity Guam Public Affairs Officer Major Tim Patrick says there are some real valid concerns about how the proposed marine base and firing range would affect cultural and historical resources on Guam. However, Major Patrick says that the Marine Corps presence on Guam will actually help to preserve these resources. “If you want to protect cultural resources one of the best ways to do that is to put a range down on it. Now, I know that sounds a little counter intuitive,” said Major Patrick adding, “The part of the range you develop or the part of a base that you develop is actually just a small part of that footprint. Everything else that is around it remains undisturbed, and it also denies access to other things that would otherwise cause damage to the archaeological record.”
Major Patrick says it protects archaeological sites from people who may wander in and pilfer ancient artifacts.