Mental Conditions Not Currently Covered In Medical Marijuana Rules and Regulations

195

 

Public Health director James Gillan also acknowledged that certain conditions dealing with mental health might need to be added to the list of conditions.

Guam – One of the issues taken up at the second public hearing for medical marijuana was the lack of any mental conditions listed in the treatable conditions.

 

A veteran, who didn’t state his name for fear of losing his benefits criticized the current rules and regulations on medical marijuana for lacking any language regarding mental health conditions.

 

“What we didn’t see on there is migraines or depression or anything like that. Personally i suffer from PTSD that’s why I couldn’t come to the first meeting. I’m on this medication called Remeron,” he said. “Remeron might sound great until you get to the side effects, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, which I could deal with marijuana, but the thing that gets me is lack of movement. Right now I’m in college, getting two degrees and lack of movement could be kind of iffy for me.”

 

Public Health director James Gillan also acknowledged that certain conditions dealing with mental health might need to be added to the list of conditions.

 

“Then we have another mental health provider that says we have to consider mental health patients who don’t have a medical condition per say, and we know that certain medications help people with certain mental conditions but again there’s that they get so used to taking that medication and maybe marijuana can help,” said Gillan.

 

Currently the rules and regulations allow for the following list of medical conditions to be treated by medical cannabis: cancer, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord, epilepsy, HIV and/or AIDS, admitted to hospice care, PTSD, rheumatoid arthritis, and any other medical condition, treatment or disease as approved by the department.

 

“I’m sorry but I cant support, I really do want to support this program for the veterans and the people of Guam but I can’t support a program if I’m looking to take more for the people than I am giving back,” he said.

 

Additionally, some continued to testify that the black market for medical cannabis will beat the medical cannabis market under the current rules and regulations. Medical cannabis advocate Andrea Pellicani was next to testify. She says, “If we launch this program and we can’t get the participation rate that we need to, we need to get those patients off the illicit market and put them into the regulated market. We need to take the cannabis off the street and put them into dispensaries and that’s the point we’ve been trying to make every time we come and speak.” 

The next public hearing is on Tuesday, May 31st at the Santa Rita Senior Center. Doors open at 6 p.m.