New CSC bills propose stiffer penalties, recourse from revenge porn

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(PNC photo)

Guam – Stiffening up penalties, closing gaps in monitoring released offenders, and preventing the nefarious use of intimate acts are the latest bills to be introduced by the legislature.

Senator James Moylan has joined in on the fight against sexual abuse by introducing two bills aimed at making sure those who do the crime will pay the time.

Bill 96-35 increases the the minimum sentencing of convicted first, second, or third-degree criminal sexual conduct to serve a minimum of 15 years.

Meanwhile, Bill 99-35 addresses the issue of monitoring and accountability. This concern was raised after the re-arrest of convicted rapist Paul Santos Mafnas Jr., who was convicted of kidnapping and raping several young girls in 1999.

Mafnas was released early from prison in 2014.

The Moylan bill mandates that any sex offender released on probation or parole must wear an electronic monitoring device.

Meanwhile, Sen. Mary Torres also proposed legislation called “Guam Uniform Civil Remedies for Unauthorized Disclosure of Intimate Images Act,” that would provide civil recourse for victims of revenge porn, or whose intimate images were shared without their consent.

The bill would enable them to recover up to $10,000 or an amount equal to the economic and non-economic damages caused by disclosure of the images – whichever is greater.

If enacted, it would also outline procedures that would allow victims to protect their identity in court proceedings.

“Bill 102 is for every victim who lost their career to a vindictive partner, every survivor forced to switch schools, and every person humiliated into hiding,” Torres said.

“While we can’t erase their suffering, civil recourse offers a powerful first step toward helping our victims fight back and correct these injustices,” Torres added.