PEW Urges NOAA to Reverse Course on Proposed “Bigeye” Tuna Rule

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Bigeye

Washington D.C. –  The PEW Trust is calling on the public to contact the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] and urge that federal agency to reverse course on a proposed rule effecting Bigeye tuna.

 

According to a release from the PEW Trust, NOAA’s proposed rule change would allow the U.S. to increase its allocation of bigeye tuna through Amendment 7 to the Fishery Ecosystem Plan for Pelagic Fisheries of the Western Pacific Region.

The bigeye is one of the largest and most valuable species of tuna and is considered a delicacy in sushi markets around the world. Nearly 40 percent of the world’s bigeye tuna is caught in the western and central Pacific Ocean, where international fishing fleets have been overfishing the population for more than a decade. Scientists are calling for a 39 percent reduction in catch to make the fishery sustainable.

The PEW release asks the public to contact NOAA’s Pacific Island Regional Administrator, Michael Tosatto, and “tell him NOAA should abide by its commitment to reduce catch of bigeye tuna in order to prevent further overfishing of this valuable species.”

The public has until February 28 to comment. You can do so HERE on the PEW website.   

READ the release from the PEW Trust below:

Stop a U-Turn on Bigeye Tuna

Act Now: Urge NOAA to keep its commitment to bigeye tuna

The bigeye is one of the largest and most valuable species of tuna and is considered a delicacy in sushi markets around the world. Nearly 40 percent of the world’s bigeye tuna is caught in the western and central Pacific Ocean, where international fishing fleets have been overfishing the population for more than a decade. Scientists are calling for a 39 percent reduction in catch to make the fishery sustainable.

In response to this recommendation, more than 25 governments from around the world, including the U.S., agreed in December to reduce catches of bigeye tuna. However, just two months after committing to reduced U.S. catches, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has issued a proposal that, if enacted, would allow the U.S. to increase its catches of bigeye tuna in the western and central Pacific by more than 80 percent. Not only would this action thwart Pacific-wide conservation efforts for bigeye, but it also would undermine the U.S. leadership role in international efforts to sustainably manage fish stocks in the western and central Pacific.

The public has until Feb. 28 to urge NOAA to reverse course on this proposed rule. Please act today by contacting Michael Tosatto, its Pacific island regional administrator. Tell him NOAA should abide by its commitment to reduce catch of bigeye tuna in order to prevent further overfishing of this valuable species.