PPP seeks OK to improve Harmon Industrial Parkway

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“[They] came to the conclusion that this is a viable project, number one, and, number two, is it’s funded by a private association, and, therefore they just gave their [OK], and basically said, ‘you guys go ahead; you don’t need our input anymore.'”

Guam – If Sen. Frank Aguon, Jr. has his way,  his colleagues  and the Governor will soon approve the A&E design for comprehensive improvements to the Harmon Industrial Parkway.

Stakeholders gathered at the public hearing room inside the Guam Congress Building on Thursday for a public hearing on Aguon’s supportive legislation and a presentation of  the architectural and engineering design plan.

A presenter told those in attendance the goals of the Harmon Industrial Park Association relative to the public private partnership already underway. Among them is a plan to widen and harden the ingress and egress at the T-intersection where the entrance to Harmon Industrial meets Marine Corps Drive by GTA Teleguam.

“The improvement that the association would like to do is to widen the north side and provide two outbound lanes out to Marine Corps Drive, and then to improve the intersection to allow the middle lane to not only make a left turn–left turn movement–but also to make a right turn movement,” he said as he pointed at giant black and white renderings.

Guam motorists know all too well the hazards of driving the industrial roads of Harmon. Pockmarked and gulched-out by years of big truck, heavy payload, and heavy equipment traffic, thoroughfares in the area are often potholed, puddled, and swirling with concrete dust. Sen. Aguon’s Bill 331-34 (COR) seeks to approve the architectural and engineering design work to rehabilitate the Harmon Industrial Parkway, including:

  • Ilipog Drive
  • Sisket Lane to the old flea market, and
  • A stretch of Hamburger Highway

Private distributor and Harmon Industrial Park Association President Frank Shimizu said the  privately funded project enjoys the Dept. of Public Works’ full blessing.

“[They] came to the conclusion that this is a viable project, number one, and, number two, is it’s funded by a private association, and, therefore they just gave their [OK], and basically said, ‘you guys go ahead; you don’t need our input anymore.'”

The total project cost is estimated at $3.7 million. Architectural and Engineering costs stand at $300,000. The project aims to make area roads safer and prevent flooding and accidents.