Rainy weather expected this week

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NWS meteorologist Mike Middlebrooke says that 14W is not likely to intensify over the next few days as it remains a very disorganized system, and poses no threat to Guam, the CNMI, Palau, FSM or the Marshall Islands.

Despite the warm and dry conditions we’ve been receiving these past few days, it appears that rainy season has decided to stick around for a little while longer. The Marianas are expected to give way to several drizzling showers this week due to multiple developing systems within the region.

According to the National Weather Service, Tropical Depression 14W was upgraded overnight to a tropical storm, now with sustained winds of 40 mph. 14W is currently located near Wake Island, centered 225 miles southwest of Wake Island near 16.8N 164.4E at 1 AM ChST Tuesday, Sept. 3. At that time, it was moving west at 18 mph with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph.

However, NWS meteorologist Mike Middlebrooke says that 14W is not likely to intensify over the next few days as it remains a very disorganized system, and poses no threat to Guam, the CNMI, Palau, FSM or the Marshall Islands.

Although 14W will not impact Guam, Middlebrooke mentions that there is another weak disturbance just south of Guam that will be responsible for a gloomy weekend. This disturbance is expected to bring scattered showers and isolated thunderstorms to Guam and the CNMI today, and also to Yap and Palau today and tonight.

“We have what appears to be a monsoon surge brewing out to the west. That’s where we get westerly winds that come out from west of the Philippines north of the equator and they’re going to be coming up over us probably in about two or three days. Our winds will switch over to the west and you’ll see some jets coming out from the west instead of to the east and that also sets up a possibility of some heavy rain it’s a typical wet season event,” Middlebrooke said.

Elsewhere in the region, Tropical Storm Lingling (15W) sits east of the northern Philippines and will continue generally north. NWS said this is also no threat to Palau, Yap, Guam or the CNMI and sits just outside of the WFO Guam Area of Responsibility.

NWS Meteorologist Brandon Adylett told the Patti Arroyo show on NewsTalk K57 that most tropical cyclones typically develop between October and November. Therefore, he advises residents to take the time now to prepare.

“Right now we’ve got several tropical systems across the western Pacific and out near the Philippines and we’re just getting into the beginning of September so people who have been around here for a long time should have some alarms going off right now like … hey we need to get prepared for any tropical storms and any typhoons that may threaten us over the next couple of months,” Adylett said.

NWS encourages residents and visitors to use National Preparedness Month as a chance to open discussions with friends and family about typhoon preparedness.

For the most up-to-date weather forecasts, go to www.weather.gov/gum/PublicForecasts.

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