Respicio Concerned About Delay in $3B Mamizu Contract

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Guam – Senator Rory Respicio is expressing his concern about the delay in the deadline for submission of proposals for the $3-billion dollar Mamizu MACC contract.

In a letter to Governor Eddie Calvo the Senator expresses hsi concerns that $2.6 billion of the total $3-billion in Japanese Mamizu funding has yet to be turned over to the U.S. Treasury.

Read Respicio’s letter to Governor Calvo

In a release, the Senator points out that “several local businesses may have banked on the buildup taking place within an expected timeframe, making investments that are at risk due to the extended timeline.”

And he expresses his concern about the potential for a “domino effect” if the $2.6 billion still in the hands of the Japanese Government is delayed much longer.

The Senator also responds to criticism that the legislature has received from some local businesses who have accused the heated anti-buildup rhetoric from some lawmakers of putting the buildup at risk.

Read Senator Respicio’s letter to Governor Calvo

In his letter to the Governor the Senator says “the best way to counter this business-centered, finger pointing effort is to bring the members of the Guam First Commission together.”

Read Senator Respicio’s release in FULL below:

Respicio to Governor: Convene Guam First Commission to Address Japan’s Freeze on Buildup Contracts

(Hagåtña, Guam) – Majority Leader and Federal Affairs Chair, Senator Rory J. Respicio, reiterated his concerns over Japan’s indefinite suspension of the Mamizu Multiple Award Construction Contract in a letter to Governor Eddie Calvo today.

Respicio noted that while $400M of the estimated $3 billion dollar contract has been received by the U.S. Treasury, suspension of the remaining amount could delay critical buildup related projects.

“If the remainder of the $2.6B takes very much longer to receive, it could have a domino effect by delaying projects that are dependent on the completion of the earlier projects,” Respicio said.

According to Respicio, several local businesses may have banked on the buildup taking place within an expected timeframe, making investments that are at risk due to the extended timeline. While these businesses have criticized the legislature, alleging that its rhetoric has put the buildup at risk, the senator points out that this indefinite delay is due exclusively to the government of Japan, and not the governments of Guam or the United States.

“I believe that the best way to counter this business-centered, finger pointing effort is to bring the members of the Guam First Commission together,” Respicio said. “That way, all members of the community can speak with one voice, and the business and government communities can have an opportunity to discover that we are really all in favor of what is best for our island and people.”