Transforming wastewater solids into compost

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Randy Salas, from LMS, said: "We took a lot of the green waste from other projects and started trying to make mulch, trying to make compost with it. And that's why we're very honored to be a part of the process that Jake was talking about and they designed the process to take these bio-solids and combine it with our bio-material and try to make compost out of it. Let's make a real product, a Guam-based product."

In an effort to find ways to reduce the amount of trash going into the Layon landfill, 28,000 pounds of the island’s garbage was examined in what officials say was the first Waste Composition Study in over 35 years.

The findings were presented at the Bureau of Statistics and Plans’ 5th Assembly of Planners Symposium held Thursday at the Dusit Thani.

The study found that 10 percent of the trash dumped in the landfill is made up of wastewater solids. That finding led to a proposal to use that organic material to make compost by combining it with green waste and wood chips from old shipping pallets.

The Port Authority of Guam, AmeriCorps, the Department of Agriculture, American President Lines, and Landscape Management Systems joined together to conduct a test to prove that it can be done.

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Randy Salas, from LMS, said: “We took a lot of the green waste from other projects and started trying to make mulch, trying to make compost with it. And that’s why we’re very honored to be a part of the process that Jacobs (a company) was talking about and they designed the process to take these bio-solids and combine it with our bio-material and try to make compost out of it. Let’s make a real product, a Guam-based product.”

Participants at the conference said the resulting compost made from locally produced bio-solids can be used for landscaping, erosion control, and restoring soil nutrients to undernourished land areas on island.

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