Tumon hotel sued by woman who nearly drowned

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The complaint states that at that time, there was no signage posted regarding the depth of the Nikko pool.

A well-known Tumon hotel has been hit with a lawsuit by a woman who nearly drowned in the establishment’s pool and claims that the hotel’s negligence resulted in her diminished quality of life.

Mira Choi and her husband Wan Lee are both Korean citizens who traveled to Guam for vacation two years ago. The couple stayed at Hotel Nikko Guam where Choi nearly drowned.

According to court documents, Choi entered the pool on June 16, 2017 and found herself in an area of the pool where her feet could not reach the bottom and she could not get out, nearly drowning.

The complaint further states that at that time, there was no signage posted regarding the depth of the pool and no lifeguards were on duty.

After a significant lapse in time, a Nikko employee pulled Choi out of the pool. However, no emergency aid was rendered and instead of calling for emergency assistance, court documents state that Choi was instead taken to her room in a wheelchair and was left there unsupervised. As a result, the complaint says that Choi lost consciousness and was later found unresponsive.

Choi was later transported from Nikko to the Guam Regional Medical City as she required emergency medical services and intensive care services. After five days, Choi was then transported by air to South Korea for further medical treatment.

The complaint states that from the date of the incident to the present, Choi has suffered serious and lasting injuries, physically, mentally and emotionally. The complaint lists a multitude of health issues including respiratory arrest, cardiac arrest, pulmonary edema, injuries to body and organs as well as the inability to have marital relations with her husband.

Choi is accusing the hotel of negligence, citing that the hotel’s conduct caused physical injuries and harm as well as emotional distress and loss of consortium.

In response, Hotel Nikko Guam admits that there was no certified lifeguard present at the time of the incident and further admits that a hotel employee did assist Choi out of the swimming pool.

However, the hotel denies all the remaining allegations, stating “after Nikko staff followed up with her on whether she was okay, Choi requested to be taken to her room and that a Nikko employee used a wheelchair to take Choi to her room and that there was no one else in her room.”

According to court documents, Nikko also argued that the negligence of Choi was greater than any alleged negligence by the hotel: “Choi’s negligence was the supervening cause of any injuries she may have sustained.”

The couple is demanding a jury trial and is suing the hotel for $1 million.

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