VOYE 2012 VIDEO: The Focus in This Primary is on the Dizon-Bordallo Race

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Guam – The primary election is a party election, where democrats and republicans, amongst themselves, decide their slate of candidates for the general election.

In this primary, most candidates will advance. Only 1 republican senatorial candidate will be eliminated.  But everyone will be looking at the rankings of all the candidates, once the votes have been counted.

The most closely watched race is the democratic congressional race where challenger Karlo Dizon hopes to take the Guam delegate seat away from incumbent Madeleine Bordallo.

PNC News caught up with the two democrats this morning as they cast their votes.

It was just six months ago when out of left field came Karlo Dizon, announcing his bid for Congress. The young, fresh, intelligent and rookie politician introduced himself as a Yale graduate with a background in economics. But his announcement left people wondering who and why? Because people needed a new way forward, he says. But despite his promise of hope, of bringing change, he was no less scrutinized. Many doubted his chances, but as the campaigning season went by, Dizon slowly caught the attention of the island.

Test polls conducted by University of Guam professor Dr. Ron McNinch showed Dizon coming closer to Incumbent Madeleine Bordallo. Although he was still far behind, to Dizon, it proved people were watching. Just before 10 a.m., an optimistic Karlo Dizon walked through the Field House doors, eager to get his vote in.The five term congresswoman walked through the Tamuning Elementary campus this morning to cast her vote, hoping to begin her sixth term on Capitol Hill.

Bordallo is a decorated politician, beginning her career in public service as the First Lady of Guam in the 1970s, then again in the 1980s. She was also a senator in the Guam Legislature. Her most memorable role perhaps, is as the first female Lieutenant Governor from 1995 to 2003, during the Gutierrez administration. As a congresswoman, she has fought for many issues affecting the island, espousing tourism and the military buildup. 

Although she has been criticized for failing to win war claims for World War 2 survivors, among other matters, she’s had her own democratic loyalists following the death of her husband, Gov. Ricky Bordallo.

Her platform has centered on her time in D.C., touting her seniority as key to getting issues to the forefront.