VIDEO: Navy Seeks a Testing Device to Identify “Wiring Fault” They Say Is a “Major Fleet-Wide Degrader” of the V-22 Osprey

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Guam – The Navy is seeking information on and a testing device for what they say is a “wiring fault” that has been identified as “a major fleet-wide degrader of operational readiness for the V-22″ Osprey aircraft.

An RFI [Request for Information] posted on the FedBizOpps.com website states:

The Naval Air Warfare Center … requires a Wiring Intermittent Fault Tester (WIFT) to detect intermittent faults in US Marine Corps MV-22, US Air Force CV-22 and other aircraft wiring systems.” 

VIEW the RFI for an WIFT for the Osprey HERE [or READ it below]

The RFI was posted November 20th, just last Tuesday.  It also states that:

“The anomalies caused by these types of  [wiring] faults abruptly appear, disappear, or undergo large changes over time or with changes in state of the aircraft or aircraft wiring system (i.e. aircraft in flight, aircraft performing ground operations, or aircraft on the ground not operating).”

“The primary physical cause of intermittent faults is mechanical damage to the insulation on a wire or wires” and theV-22 [Osprey] aircraft program is seeking to procure / develop such a tester in the near future.”

The RFI describes the Fault Tester the Navy is looking for as a device that has “the capability to reliably and accurately fault isolate and fault detect wiring intermittent faults at the flightline (Organizational) maintenance level in the US Navy and Marine Corps military aviation environment.”

Deployment of the Osprey to Okinawa in October has stirred controversy and protests there by Okinawan residents who have questioned the safety of the aircraft which they fear is accident prone.

NHK last Thursday reported that an exercise involving the Osprey, which was originally scheduled to take place in Okinawa, would be moved to Guam “to reduce the burden on people in Okinawa.”

Monday, the Marine Corp announced that 3 Ospreys would be arriving on Guam December 8th to participate in the “Forager Fury” exercise which begins Thursday.

In a statement to PNC News Monday, Marine Corps Activity-Guam Public Affairs Officer Lt.Col. Aisha Bakkar said:

“The MV-22 is a very safe aircraft to fly in and far safer now than it ever has been. Through material solutions, bi-annual software updates and
enhanced pilot training, we have improved the safety of the MV-22 making it one of the safest aircraft in the Marine Corps. At this time, the MV-22 is well below the average mishap rate for the Marine Corps and all DoD tactical rotary wing aircraft.”

Governor Calvo’s Buildup Office Director Mark Calvo told PNC  News Monday that the Governor’s Office has no objections to the deployment of the Osprey here.   

READ the Navy’s RFI for an “Intermittent fault tester” for the V-22 Osprey below:

Synopsis:
Added: Nov 20, 2012 11:25 am
Background

This is a Request for Information (RFI) synopsis for written information only. This is not a solicitation announcement for proposals and no contract will be awarded as a result of this announcement.

The Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, NJ (NAWCADLKE) requires a Wiring Intermittent Fault Tester (WIFT) to detect intermittent faults in US Marine Corps MV-22, US Air Force CV-22 and other aircraft wiring systems. This type of aircraft wiring fault has been identified as a major fleet-wide degrader of operational readiness for the V-22 aircraft community.
The following definitions relate specifically to this RFI.

Definitions

Aircraft Wiring System: The totality of parts, components and subsystems including connectors, contacts, metallic wire, shielding, braid, terminals, splices, and other items, materials and processes, purposefully designed, integrated and fabricated to provide the aircraft electrical and electronic interconnecting network . For this RFI, the aircraft wiring system does not include any fiber optic components or subsystems.

Aircraft Wiring Faults: Physical damage, degradation, or other anomalous condition, to any part(s), component(s), or subsystem(s) of the aircraft wiring system, that results in malfunctioning, degraded functioning, or termination of functionality of a portion of the aircraft wiring system.

Fault Detection: The ability to identify that a particular type of fault is present in the aircraft wiring system

Fault Isolation: The ability to spatially locate a fault in an aircraft wiring system.

Persistent Faults: Non-intermittent faults. The anomalies caused by these types of faults do not abruptly appear, disappear, or undergo large changes over time or with changes in state of the aircraft or aircraft wiring system (i.e. aircraft in flight, aircraft performing ground operations, or aircraft on the ground not operating).

The primary physical cause of persistent faults is mechanical damage to the insulation on a wire or wires (chafe damage, cuts into the insulation, etc.) that result in the exposure of the metallic conductor to the environment. If this exposed metallic conductor is in continuous (persistent) anomalous contact with another conductor (i.e. another exposed conductor on a different chaffed wire, cable or wire harness assembly shields, aircraft components or aircraft structure), then a persistent short may result. Persistent faults can also be caused by breaks in electrical continuity of the conductors (i.e. opens) due to broken/cut wires. Fault detection for persistent faults is typically accomplished utilizing various electrical meters (i.e. ohmmeter, digital multi-meter (DMM)). Fault isolation for persistent faults is typically accomplished via troubleshooting techniques or by utilizing a time-domain reflectometer or similar tester.

Intermittent Faults: Non-persistent faults. The anomalies caused by these types of faults abruptly appear, disappear, or undergo large changes over time or with changes in state of the aircraft or aircraft wiring system (i.e. aircraft in flight, aircraft performing ground operations, or aircraft on the ground not operating).

The primary physical cause of intermittent faults is mechanical damage to the insulation on a wire or wires (chafe damage, cuts into the insulation, etc.) that result in the exposure of the metallic conductor to the environment. If this exposed metallic conductor is in very close proximity (but not in continuous (persistent) contact) with another conductor (i.e. another exposed conductor on a different chaffed wire, cable or wire harness assembly shields, aircraft components or aircraft structure), then an intermittent short condition may arise when the damaged wire is subjected to environmental stimuli (i.e. aircraft flight dynamics, airframe vibration caused by the operation of the engines, temperature cycling). Similarly, an intermittent open condition can result if a conductor is damaged, but maintains electrical continuity during static conditions. However, when the aircraft is subject to flight conditions or other stimuli, the conductor may react in such a way that continuity is lost intermittently. The primary characteristic of intermittent faults is that they can manifest when the aircraft is subjected to the above mentioned environmental stimuli and that they can disappear when the aircraft is not operating and on the ground. Intermittent faults are unpredictable and therefore difficult to detect. Fault detection for intermittent faults is typically accomplished utilizing various high voltage meters (i.e. megohmmeter (“megger“)). Fault isolation for intermittent faults is typically only accomplished via troubleshooting techniques. No electrical tester, able to reliably fault isolate intermittent faults, is known to be in service supporting any Department of Defense (DoD) aircraft weapon systems.

Wiring Intermittent Fault Tester (WIFT): Is an aircraft wiring system electrical tester that has the capability to reliably and accurately fault isolate and fault detect wiring intermittent faults at the flightline (Organizational) maintenance level in the US Navy and Marine Corps military aviation environment. The V-22 aircraft program is seeking to procure / develop such a tester in the near future.

Request for Information:

The NAWCADLKE is seeking information from industry regarding WIFT technology. Please provide the following information about a WIFT, or WIFT technology that is either under development or that is a product supplied by your company / organization:

1) General description of your WIFT product / technology.

2) Identification of critical enabling technologies of your WIFT. Include technology readiness level (TRL) of your WIFT product / technology and a summary of field usage, test and demonstration results. Describe, if applicable, any additional stimuli that must be applied to the unit under test (e.g. physical manipulation to induce faults, etc.).

3) Overview of your WIFT concept of operation (including user operating manual if available). Discuss the operator – WIFT interface, WIFT – aircraft interface and any related issues. Discuss anticipated and demonstrated benefit versus cost of utilization of your WIFT and any demonstrated Return on Investment (ROI).

4) Discuss critical information required for the use of your WIFT (e.g. lengths of aircraft wiring harnesses; types of wires comprising aircraft wiring harnesses; test signal velocity of propagation (VoP); etc.)

5) Discuss fault detection reliability, including types of detectable faults (e.g. faults due to insulation damage, connector/contact damage, etc.), and fault isolation distance-to-fault accuracy.

6) Describe environmental testing test methods and results that your WIFT has been subjected to. Discuss environmental thresholds that the WIFT is approved to operate in (e.g. Electromagnetic susceptibility or emissions; operating / storage temperature; humidity; altitude; shock. Please provide a detailed thorough discussion of any explosive atmosphere testing).

7) If applicable, provide customer testimonials with references. Provide your point(s) of contact.

8) Provide information about your company / organization including: Brief description of your company / organization; Small / large business, 8A, hub-zone, veteran owned status; Any past or present Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) awards related to your WIFT.

9) Provide any additional information you desire.

General Guidelines

Your information package should not exceed 25 pages. Any operator manual provided shall not be counted against this page limitation. Responses to this RFI should be submitted via email to Jacquelyn Poston at jacquelyn.poston@navy.mil, no later than 15 days from the date of this posting.

The Government may elect not to discuss submissions received in response to this RFI with individual responders.

There is no requirement to respond to the RFI in order to be eligible to propose on the planned RFP. However, the Government places tremendous value on the information received and may utilize it to finalize its acquisition strategy. Respondents shall fully use this opportunity to describe proven capabilities in performing services similar to those described in the PWS.

DISCLAIMER

The Government does not intend to award a contract on the basis of this RFI. This RFI is issued solely for information and planning purposes and does not constitute a solicitation. In accordance with FAR 15.201(e) responses to this notice are not offers and cannot be accepted by the Government to form a binding contract/agreement. Respondents are solely responsible for all expenses associated with responding to this RFI. Responses to this RFI will not be returned. Respondents will not be notified of the results of the review. NO FORMAL SOLICITATION EXISTS AT THIS TIME.

 
Contracting Office Address:
Contracts Department
Hwy. 547 Attn:B562-3C
Lakehurst, New Jersey 08733-5083

 :
Added: Nov 20, 2012 11:25 am

Background

This is a Request for Information (RFI) synopsis for written information only. This is not a solicitation announcement for proposals and no contract will be awarded as a result of this announcement.

The Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, NJ (NAWCADLKE) requires a Wiring Intermittent Fault Tester (WIFT) to detect intermittent faults in US Marine Corps MV-22, US Air Force CV-22 and other aircraft wiring systems. This type of aircraft wiring fault has been identified as a major fleet-wide degrader of operational readiness for the V-22 aircraft community.
The following definitions relate specifically to this RFI.

Definitions

Aircraft Wiring System:
The totality of parts, components and subsystems including connectors, contacts, metallic wire, shielding, braid, terminals, splices, and other items, materials and processes, purposefully designed, integrated and fabricated to provide the aircraft electrical and electronic interconnecting network . For this RFI, the aircraft wiring system does not include any fiber optic components or subsystems.

Aircraft Wiring Faults: Physical damage, degradation, or other anomalous condition, to any part(s), component(s), or subsystem(s) of the aircraft wiring system, that results in malfunctioning, degraded functioning, or termination of functionality of a portion of the aircraft wiring system.

Fault Detection: The ability to identify that a particular type of fault is present in the aircraft wiring system

Fault Isolation: The ability to spatially locate a fault in an aircraft wiring system.

Persistent Faults: Non-intermittent faults. The anomalies caused by these types of faults do not abruptly appear, disappear, or undergo large changes over time or with changes in state of the aircraft or aircraft wiring system (i.e. aircraft in flight, aircraft performing ground operations, or aircraft on the ground not operating).

The primary physical cause of persistent faults is mechanical damage to the insulation on a wire or wires (chafe damage, cuts into the insulation, etc.) that result in the exposure of the metallic conductor to the environment. If this exposed metallic conductor is in continuous (persistent) anomalous contact with another conductor (i.e. another exposed conductor on a different chaffed wire, cable or wire harness assembly shields, aircraft components or aircraft structure), then a persistent short may result. Persistent faults can also be caused by breaks in electrical continuity of the conductors (i.e. opens) due to broken/cut wires. Fault detection for persistent faults is typically accomplished utilizing various electrical meters (i.e. ohmmeter, digital multi-meter (DMM)). Fault isolation for persistent faults is typically accomplished via troubleshooting techniques or by utilizing a time-domain reflectometer or similar tester.

Intermittent Faults: Non-persistent faults. The anomalies caused by these types of faults abruptly appear, disappear, or undergo large changes over time or with changes in state of the aircraft or aircraft wiring system (i.e. aircraft in flight, aircraft performing ground operations, or aircraft on the ground not operating).

The primary physical cause of intermittent faults is mechanical damage to the insulation on a wire or wires (chafe damage, cuts into the insulation, etc.) that result in the exposure of the metallic conductor to the environment. If this exposed metallic conductor is in very close proximity (but not in continuous (persistent) contact) with another conductor (i.e. another exposed conductor on a different chaffed wire, cable or wire harness assembly shields, aircraft components or aircraft structure), then an intermittent short condition may arise when the damaged wire is subjected to environmental stimuli (i.e. aircraft flight dynamics, airframe vibration caused by the operation of the engines, temperature cycling). Similarly, an intermittent open condition can result if a conductor is damaged, but maintains electrical continuity during static conditions. However, when the aircraft is subject to flight conditions or other stimuli, the conductor may react in such a way that continuity is lost intermittently. The primary characteristic of intermittent faults is that they can manifest when the aircraft is subjected to the above mentioned environmental stimuli and that they can disappear when the aircraft is not operating and on the ground. Intermittent faults are unpredictable and therefore difficult to detect. Fault detection for intermittent faults is typically accomplished utilizing various high voltage meters (i.e. megohmmeter (“megger“)). Fault isolation for intermittent faults is typically only accomplished via troubleshooting techniques. No electrical tester, able to reliably fault isolate intermittent faults, is known to be in service supporting any Department of Defense (DoD) aircraft weapon systems.

Wiring Intermittent Fault Tester (WIFT): Is an aircraft wiring system electrical tester that has the capability to reliably and accurately fault isolate and fault detect wiring intermittent faults at the flightline (Organizational) maintenance level in the US Navy and Marine Corps military aviation environment. The V-22 aircraft program is seeking to procure / develop such a tester in the near future.

Request for Information:

The NAWCADLKE is seeking information from industry regarding WIFT technology. Please provide the following information about a WIFT, or WIFT technology that is either under development or that is a product supplied by your company / organization:

1) General description of your WIFT product / technology.

2) Identification of critical enabling technologies of your WIFT. Include technology readiness level (TRL) of your WIFT product / technology and a summary of field usage, test and demonstration results. Describe, if applicable, any additional stimuli that must be applied to the unit under test (e.g. physical manipulation to induce faults, etc.).

3) Overview of your WIFT concept of operation (including user operating manual if available). Discuss the operator – WIFT interface, WIFT – aircraft interface and any related issues. Discuss anticipated and demonstrated benefit versus cost of utilization of your WIFT and any demonstrated Return on Investment (ROI).

4) Discuss critical information required for the use of your WIFT (e.g. lengths of aircraft wiring harnesses; types of wires comprising aircraft wiring harnesses; test signal velocity of propagation (VoP); etc.)

5) Discuss fault detection reliability, including types of detectable faults (e.g. faults due to insulation damage, connector/contact damage, etc.), and fault isolation distance-to-fault accuracy.

6) Describe environmental testing test methods and results that your WIFT has been subjected to. Discuss environmental thresholds that the WIFT is approved to operate in (e.g. Electromagnetic susceptibility or emissions; operating / storage temperature; humidity; altitude; shock. Please provide a detailed thorough discussion of any explosive atmosphere testing).

7) If applicable, provide customer testimonials with references. Provide your point(s) of contact.

8) Provide information about your company / organization including: Brief description of your company / organization; Small / large business, 8A, hub-zone, veteran owned status; Any past or present Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) awards related to your WIFT.

9) Provide any additional information you desire.

General Guidelines

Your information package should not exceed 25 pages. Any operator manual provided shall not be counted against this page limitation. Responses to this RFI should be submitted via email to Jacquelyn Poston at jacquelyn.poston@navy.mil, no later than 15 days from the date of this posting.

The Government may elect not to discuss submissions received in response to this RFI with individual responders.

There is no requirement to respond to the RFI in order to be eligible to propose on the planned RFP. However, the Government places tremendous value on the information received and may utilize it to finalize its acquisition strategy. Respondents shall fully use this opportunity to describe proven capabilities in performing services similar to those described in the PWS.

DISCLAIMER

The Government does not intend to award a contract on the basis of this RFI. This RFI is issued solely for information and planning purposes and does not constitute a solicitation. In accordance with FAR 15.201(e) responses to this notice are not offers and cannot be accepted by the Government to form a binding contract/agreement. Respondents are solely responsible for all expenses associated with responding to this RFI. Responses to this RFI will not be returned. Respondents will not be notified of the results of the review. NO FORMAL SOLICITATION EXISTS AT THIS TIME.

 

:

Contracts Department
Hwy. 547 Attn:B562-3C
Lakehurst, New Jersey 08733-5083